Startling facts about distracted driving

Distracted driving is deadly behavior. It consistently ranks as one of the traffic safety issues at the forefront of many drivers’ thinking. Distraction contributes to more than 3,000 traffic fatalities each year. BLR points out some startling statistics below.

Don’t assume that your employees “get it” when it comes to the risk in distracted driving. Help protect them from themselves by sharing these startling facts with them. According to the Network of Employers for Traffic Safety.

  • In 2012, 3,328 people were killed and more than 420,000 were injured in crashes involving distracted driving.
  • Crashes involving a distracted driver cost about $46 billion per year.
  • Using a cell phone is more likely to lead to a crash or near crash than other forms of distraction, primarily because they are used so often and so much.
  • Drivers using cell phones look at, but fail to see, up to 50 percent of the information in their driving environment.
  • At any given time, about 9 percent of drivers are visibly speaking into a handheld or hands-free mobile device.
  • Using a cell phone while driving studies significantly delays driver reaction time.
  • There is no significant difference between the cognitive distractions involved when using a hands-free versus a handheld device.
  • About a quarter of drivers in a 2013 survey reported sending a text message or email while driving at least once in the past 30 days. Nearly three-quarters said they had read a text or email.
  • Sending a text message takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of 5 seconds. That’s like driving the length of a football field at 55 miles per hour with your eyes closed.
  • Texting and keying into electronic devices while driving is illegal for all drivers in 44 U.S. states, the District of Columbia., Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Texting is also prohibited by many cities and counties. Many states, counties, and municipalities also ban the use of handheld phones while driving as well.

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