Monthly Archives March 2018

Hoteliers navigate tricky class-action waiver landscape

New roll-backs by the NLRB (National Labor Relations Board) suggest the organization is restoring balance between employers and employees by reviewing the legality and enforceability of employee class and collective waivers in arbitration agreements. Although the ruling is still debatable, it is expected to have consequences for employers and employees and may offer guidelines on how to make these agreements more enforceable. Employers should wait for the ruling before making any changes to their agreements. Hotel Management, Elliot Mest, reports the facts surrounding deliberations.

Class-action waivers are a tricky subject if employers want to avoid hampering employee morale, while also covering their tracks.

We often imagine the rule of law as something rigid or set in stone, but in...

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California adopts new workplace safety regulation to protect hotel housekeepers

Recent studies show “hotel room designs and decor, not area, determine housekeeper workloads and musculoskeletal demands. Attempts to set production standards or restriction of workloads based solely upon the average size of a hotel room could produce large variations in housekeeper workloads and exposures to MSD risk factors.”

New standard recently passed by Cal/OSHA “requires employers to identify, evaluate, and correct housekeeping related hazards with the involvement of housekeepers and their union representative.” Effective July 1, 2018, hotel employers must develop, apply, and maintain an effective Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention Program (MIPP). Advisen Insurance, provides key points that must be included in each policy.

U.S...

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“Hands Off, Pants On” When Guests Sexually Harass Your Hotel Employees

Initiated in many forms, harassment is a widespread problem for hotel workers across the nation. Ranging from jokes to propositions to assaults, approximately 95% of women working in the hospitality industry have experienced some kind of inappropriate advance from a male guest. While cities across the nation continue to take steps to address the inappropriate behavior, hotels themselves are also urged to take a stance against the abuses by clearly stating anti-harassment policies and providing a number of outlets for reporting an incident. Fisher Phillips attorneys provide key points employers should consider immediately to minimize legal liabilities.

In April 2016 survey of 400 Chicago-area women working at hotels, nearly 50 percent indicated that they have had a guest answer the doo...

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Get vendor agreement in writing before the worst happens

The power of a vendor or contractor agreement lies in the details it contains and the protections you require. Pay particular attention to insurance provisions by all parties involved in the service provided. Vendors, third-party vendors, contractors and sub-contractors should all be subject to the same risk management, security, privacy, and other policies that would be expected if the hotel were conducting the activities in-house. Hotel Management, Jack Garson, points out key areas hoteliers should consider.

When the delivery truck crashes into your hotel lobby, who pays for the new wall? If the truck hits your guests, who covers the medical bills? What does your delivery agreement say? What agreement? It matters.

Today, hotels are so focused on revenues and profits from guests an...

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