Category Hospitality Safety

“Hands Off, Pants On” When Guests Sexually Harass Your Hotel Employees

Initiated in many forms, harassment is a widespread problem for hotel workers across the nation. Ranging from jokes to propositions to assaults, approximately 95% of women working in the hospitality industry have experienced some kind of inappropriate advance from a male guest. While cities across the nation continue to take steps to address the inappropriate behavior, hotels themselves are also urged to take a stance against the abuses by clearly stating anti-harassment policies and providing a number of outlets for reporting an incident. Fisher Phillips attorneys provide key points employers should consider immediately to minimize legal liabilities.

In April 2016 survey of 400 Chicago-area women working at hotels, nearly 50 percent indicated that they have had a guest answer the doo...

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Drury Plaza Hotel in Pittsburgh facing lawsuit from allegedly injured contractor

When it comes to worksite safety, contractors, design professionals and project owners all have different roles and responsibilities. At the same time, responsibility and liability can arise from other circumstances such as statutory and common law, contract terms and conditions, and actions by parties in the project field. The key to the project owner minimizing risks from injured construction workers is to successfully delegate the worksite safety responsibility to the contractor in the language of the contract, and never assert control over the means, methods and procedures of the contractor’s work during the project. Keep in mind that merely retaining the right to stop, inspect or approve work is generally not enough to create owner liability...

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Short Breaks, Stretching, and Moving Around Help Avoid Ergonomic Injuries

It’s no secret that ergonomic injuries at work are a widespread multi-billion dollar problem across all industries and in all states. With proper training, management support and clear processes in place, employers can systematically identify and manage ergonomic risk factors and apply solutions to reduce physical problems and increase an employee’s ability to work more efficiently.  Ergonomic claims will remain a high-priced issue for businesses that choose to ignore it. State Fund Safety News, provides inexpensive solutions to common ergonomic issues – a guide every employer should read.

Did You Know?

Ergonomic injuries account for 37 percent of all workplace injuries according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), most of them attributed to overexertion...

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A boy was poisoned at a hotel and died. Now his family has reached a high-priced settlement.

The cost of installing lithium operated carbon monoxide detectors in guest rooms is entirely feasible and completely sensible for hotels. The price is minuscule when compared to this high-priced settlement and most importantly, its an inconsiderable price to pay for human life!

An Observer investigation reveals a series of errors and decisions made by hotel management, town employees, and the medical examiner contributed to the death of 11 year old boy and left his mother with serious injuries from carbon monoxide poisoning leaking from the hotel swimming pool heating system. Advisen Insurance reports the event.

Jan...

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Hotel Security: How to Optimise It

Evolving technology and the digital world has brought forth new meaning to hotel security. While cybersecurity has become a common topic among security professionals, there are several components that complete hotel security. From surveillance to the quality of room locks, every element of guest, employee, and property safety should be addressed equally. Hospitalitynet, Lillian Connors, outlines some note-worthy recommendations to help hotel security professionals optimize safety and security on their properties.

Running a hotel business is a lucrative move towards financial success down the road, however, it’s not without its drawbacks...

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Three steps to follow before and after disaster strikes

The recent influx of natural disaster across the nation and across the globe is a profound indicator that every hotel facility should have an Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan in place. The plan should be multi-faceted to include guests, employees, and property management procedures before, during and after disaster strikes. The tourism economy and profits are often at the mercy of the storm. How you prepare, respond, and react to your call of duty can make or break your business. Hotel Management, Victoria Rosenthal, suggests three important steps to speed up the recovery process.

When disaster strikes, hotels are susceptible to damage as any commercial property or residence...

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California proposes hotel ‘panic button’ bill to protect workers from assaults, sex harassment

“A former employer took more than 20 minutes to respond after I alerted them that a man exposed himself to me in a hallway.” Hotels are under increased scrutiny as workers, cities, and the State of California push for legislation requiring employers to equip room attendants with panic buttons in an effort to prevent violent assaults and sexual harassment in the industry. If passed, California will be the first state in the nation to impose legislation state-wide. CNBC, Jeff Daniels, reports.

  • A California bill was introduced Wednesday that requires hotels to provide hotel room cleaners with panic buttons.
  • The so-called hotel maid “panic button” bill is designed to protect employees from assaults by guests.
  • If passed, it would make California the first to have a statewide law manda...
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OSHA penalties increase by 2 percent

OSHA has begun the New Year with penalty hikes.  Effective January 2, 2018, civil penalties for violations of OSHA standards and regulations increased 2%. The penalty increase applies to Federal OSHA states; however, states operating their own occupational safety and health programs are expected to introduce comparable penalty structures making them equally effective. Safety.BLR.com, Emily Scace, compares penalty structures and increases in the charts below.

Effective January 2, civil penalties for violations of workplace safety and health standards are 2 percent higher, with a new maximum fine of nearly $130,000...

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Westgate Hotel testing firearm-detecting security system

Modern security has arrived! Providing a great guest experience while ensuring the safety of guests, employees, and company assets is a necessary but difficult task every hotelier faces. Westgate Hotel in Las Vegas has recently partnered with Patriot One Technologies Inc, to test its NForce weapons dectection system. NForce is a discreet weapon sensing system that uses Cognitive Microwave Radar to detect concentrations of iron based metals such as guns, knives, and bombs. With a consistent 94% accuracy rate, the units are small enough to hide inside existing infrastructure. New3 Las Vegas, Gerard Ramalho, shares a glimpse of this exciting new technology.

Chances are the next time you enter the Westgate Hotel in Las Vegas, you will have passed through a state of t...

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Understanding Greywater and Its Proper Uses for Hotels

Although it can be expensive initially, using grey water can meet up to 50% of a property’s water needs by supplying water for landscaping. Grey water also provides nutrients to plants.  Furthermore, using grey water for your landscaping needs can prove to be a significant cost savings. Lodging Magazine shares the rules and guidelines you must follow for proper grey water use.

One of the many ways commercial facilities and hotels are reducing water consumption is to use greywater. Greywater is typically defined as “gently used” water that comes from restroom sinks, kitchen sinks, showers, etc. Facilities that use greywater are often “doubled plumbed,” with greywater going into storage tanks and water from toilets and urinals discharged into sewer systems.

While some greywa...

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